Course Descriptions

Students are encouraged to complete the lower and upper division core courses early in their program, since these courses will provide a foundation to enhance subsequent course work. Global Health majors should complete the upper division core courses, GLBH 181, GLBH 148 (formerly ANSC 148) and if possible, MGT 173 prior to senior year.

Not all courses are offered every year. Courses are subject to change without notice.

**New Global Health Course for 2017-18** 

GLBH 20. Introduction to Global Health

(Can be taken in place of HILD 30. History of Public Health)

Provides a foundational interdisciplinary understanding of complex global health issues and introduces major concepts and principles in global health. The course surveys the range of problems contributing to the global burden of disease and disability including infectious disease, mental illness, refugee and immigrant health, natural disasters, climate change, and food insecurity.

Global Health Core Courses

GLBH 148. Global Health and Cultural Diversity (cross-listed with ANSC 148)

Introduction to global health from the perspective of medical anthropology on disease and illness, cultural conceptions of health, doctor-patient interaction, illness experience, medical science and technology, mental health, infectious disease, and health-care inequalities by ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status.

GLBH 181. Essentials of Global Health

This course will provide an overview of global health as a field of research and practice, with an emphasis on use of surveillance methods to understand health and determinants of health, evidence-based program development and evaluation of programs in the field, and engagement with governments and advocacy groups to elicit evidence-based policy change. Topics of focus will prioritize infectious diseases, maternal child health, substance use and gender-based violence, as case examples of global health research and programmatic approaches. By the end of this course students should have acquired an understanding of the global burden of major diseases and population health concerns, how to understand and intervene upon the determinants of disease and other health concerns, and how to develop and implement monitoring and outcome evaluations for use in low resource settings.

MGT 173. Project Management in Health Services

This course covers efficient techniques for managing health services projects including both the technical aspects of project management as well as the human capital management issues associated with blending administrative and technical staff with healthcare professionals. Topics include: scheduling methods, milestone setting, governmental regulations, resource allocation, interpersonal skills, and performing research and development projects - all with a health services focus.

Lower Division Courses

All Majors and Minors must complete:

HILD 30. History of Public Health: Explores the history of public health, from the plague hospitals of Renaissance Italy to the current and future prospects for global health initiatives, emphasizing the complex biological, cultural, and social dimensions of health, sickness, and medicine across time and space. 

For Majors Only:

Choose One:

SOCI 30. Science, Technology, and Society: A series of case studies of the relations between society and modern science, technology, and medicine. Global warming, reproductive medicine, AIDS, and other topical cases prompt students to view science-society interactions as problematic and complex. 

SOCI 40. Sociology of Health-Care Issues: Designed as a broad introduction to medicine as a social institution and its relationship to other institutions as well as its relation to society. It will make use of both micro and macro sociological work in this area and introduce students to sociological perspectives of contemporary health-care issues. 

SOCI 70. General Sociology for Premedical Students: This introductory course is specifically designed for premedical students and will provide them with a broad introduction to sociological concepts and research, particularly as applied to medicine.

PHIL 26. Science, Society, and Values: An exploration of the interaction between scientific theory and practice on the one hand, and society and values on the other. Topics can include the relationship between science and religion, global climate change, DNA, medicine, and ethics. 

Statistics Course (Choose one)

PSYCH 60. Introduction to Statistics: This course provides an introduction to both descriptive and inferential statistics, core tools in the process of scientific discovery and the interpretation of research. Recommended to complete during a student's 2nd year. 

POLI 30. Political Inquiry: Introduction to the logic of inference in social science and to quantitative analysis in political science and public policy including research design, data collection, data description and computer graphics, and the logic of statistical inference (including linear regression). Poli Sci 30 is Lecture only, and Poli Sci 30D is Lecture plus Discussion section. These courses are equivalents of each other in regards to major requirements, and students may not receive credit for both 30 and 30D. 

MATH 11/11L. Calculus-Based Introductory Probability and Statistic + Lab: Events and probabilities, conditional probability, Bayes’ formula. Discrete random variables: mean, variance; binomial, Poisson distributions. Continuous random variables: densities, mean, variance; normal, uniform, exponential distributions, central limit theorem. Sample statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression. Applications. Intended for biology and social science majors. Prerequisites: AP Calculus BC score of 3, 4, or 5, or Math 10B or Math 20B, and concurrent enrollment in Math 11L.

Policy Analysis Courses (Majors only)

Choose one:

GLBH 160. Global Health Policy: Students will learn fundamental principles and concepts of global health policy, law, and governance. The course will focus on identifying critical global health policy challenges and solving them using a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the perspectives of various stakeholders. 

POLI 160AA. Introduction to Policy Analysis: (Same as USP 101) This course will explore the process by which the preferences of individuals are converted into public policy. Also included will be an examination of the complexity of policy problems, methods for designing better policies, and a review of tools used by analysts and policy makers. (Prerequisites: Poli Sci 10 or 11)

POLI 170A. Introductory Statistics for Political Science and Public Policy: Introduction to the use of statistics in both political science and public policy concentrating on regression based approaches. Students undertake a series of small quantitative analyses and one project. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

USP 147. Case Studies in Health Care Programs/Poor and Underserved Populations: The purpose of this course is to identify the special health needs of low income and underserved populations and to review their status of care, factors influencing the incidence of disease and health problems, and political and legislative measures related to access and the provision of care. Selected current programs and policies that address the health care needs of selected underserved populations such as working poor, inner city populations, recent immigrants, and persons with severe disabling mental illnesses will be studied. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

USP 171. Sustainable Development: Sustainable development is a concept invoked by an increasingly wide range of scholars, activists, and organizations dedicated to promoting environmentally sound approaches to economic development. This course critically examines the diverse, often contradictory, interests in sustainability. It provides a transdisciplinary overview of emergent theories and practices. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

SOCI 152/USP 133. Social Inequality and Public Policy: (Same as USP 133.) Primary focus on understanding and analyzing poverty and public policy. Analysis of how current debates and public policy initiatives mesh with alternative social scientific explorations of poverty. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 152 and SOCC 152.

ECON 130. Public Policy: (pre-reqs: ECON 1A-B. or ECON 2. or ECON 100A) Course uses basic microeconomic tools to discuss a wide variety of public issues, including the war on drugs, global warming, natural resources, health care and safety regulation. Appropriate for majors who have not completed Econ 100A-B-C and students from other departments. Prerequisites: Econ 2 or 100A.

HISC 180. Science and Public Policy: This course will explore the evolution of the institutions, ideologies, procedures, standards, and expertise that modern democratic societies have used in applying science to generate and legitimate public policy.

ENVR 110. Environmental Law: Explores environmental policy in the United States and the ways in which it is reflected in law. The social and political issues addressed include environmental justice and environmental racism, as well as the role of government in implementing environmental law. Prerequisites:upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

Elective Descriptions

Biological Sciences Electives:

Please visit the Division of Biological Sciences webpage for elective course descriptions.

*ANBI 134. Human Evolutionary Genetics: This course explores how genetic data can be used to address core issues in human evolution. We will reconstruct population history and explore sources of human genetic diversity, such as migration and selection, based on studies of modern and ancient DNA. Through critical evaluation of recent publications, we will discuss the molecular evidence for the origin of modern humans, race, reconstruction of key human migrations, interactions with the environment, and implications for disease. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

*ANBI 141. The Evolution of Human Diet: The genotype of our ancestors had no agriculture or animal domestication, or rudimentary technology. Our modern diet contributes to heart disease, cancers, and diabetes. This course will outline the natural diet of primates and compare it with early human diets. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

Medical Social Sciences:

Anthropology

ANSC 101. Aging: Culture and Health in Late Life Human Development: Examines aging as process of human development, from local and global perspectives. Focuses on the interrelationships of social, cultural, psychological, and health factors that shape the experience and well-being of aging populations. Students explore the challenges and wisdom of aging. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

ANSC 105. Global Health and Inequality: Why is there variation of health outcomes across the world? We will discuss health and illness in context of culture and address concerns in cross-national health variations by comparing healthcare systems in developed, underdeveloped, and developing countries. Study the role of socioeconomic and political change in determining health outcomes and examine social health determinants in contemporary global health problems: multidrug resistance to antibiotics, gender violence, and human trafficking, etc. Prerequisites: ANTH 21 or ANTH 23.

ANSC 106. Global Health: Indigenous Medicines in Latin America: Drawing on medical anthropology ethnography, students will explore a variety of forms of healing among rural and urban indigenous communities. A particular focus on intercultural health will allow the students to analyze contemporary medical landscapes where patients encounter indigenous and Western medicine. Students will learn about the complexities of urban and rural indigenous healing settings and their sociopolitical significance in contexts of state biomedical interventions. Prerequisites: ANTH 21 or 23. Freshmen and sophomores cannot enroll without consent of the instructor.

ANSC 121. Psychological Anthropology: Interrelationships of aspects of individual personality and various aspects of sociocultural systems are considered. Relations of sociocultural contexts to motives, values, cognition, personal adjustment, stress and pathology, and qualities of personal experience are emphasized

ANSC 143. Mental Health as a Global Health Priority: Why is mental health a global concern? This anthropological course reviews globalization, culture, and mental health. We examine issues of social suffering, stigma, and economic burden associated with mental illness, gender inequality, political violence, "global security," pharmaceutical and illegal drugs.

ANSC 144. Immigrant and Refugee Health: Examines physical and mental health sequaelae of internal and transnational movement of individuals and populations due to warfare, political violence, natural disaster, religious persecution, poverty and struggle for economic survival, and social suffering of communities abandoned by migrants and refugees.

ANSC 146. A Global Health Perspective on HIV/AIDS: An introductory course on HIV taught through a medical student format, with emphasis on research and experiential learning, including observation of physicians providing care for patients from diverse socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds, some of whom may be underinsured/uninsured, homeless, and/or immigrants.

ANSC 147. Global Health and the Environment: Examines interactions of culture, health, and environment. Rural and urban human ecologies, their energy foundations, sociocultural systems, and characteristic health and environmental problems are explored. The role of culture and human values in designing solutions will be investigated.

ANSC 149. Gender and Mental Health

ANSC 150. Culture and Mental Health: This course reviews mental health cross-culturally and transnationally. Issues examined are cultural shaping of the interpretation, experience, symptoms, treatment, course, and recovery of mental illness. World Health Organization findings of better outcome in non-European and North American countries are explored.

ANSC 155. Humanitarian Aid: What is it Good For?: This course examines the intended and unintended consequences of humanitarian aid. How do organizations negotiate principles of equality with the reality of limited resources? What role does medicine play in aid efforts? In spaces where multiple vulnerabilities coexist, how do we decide whom we should help first? While the need for aid, charity, and giving in the face of suffering is often taken as a commonsensical

ANSC 156. Mad Films: This course examines historical and cultural dimensions of madness as depicted in iconic and popular films such as One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Girl Interrupted, Silver Linings Playbook, along with ethnographic and artistic films that utilize anthropological approaches.

ANSC 164. Anthropology of Medicine: Basic concepts and theory of medical anthropology are introduced and applied to comparison of medical systems including indigenous and biomedical, taking into account cross-cultural variation in causal explanation, diagnosis, perception, management, and treatment of illness and disease.

ANSC 182. Gun Violence as Social Pathology: In this seminar, we investigate gun violence from a critical perspective that draws on social and health sciences, films, media, and more. While we take the contemporary issue of gun violence in the United States as a primary case study, we employ a global and comparative perspective. We explore controversies to include cultural, gendered, ethnic, political, and economic analysis. We examine discourses on gun violence as rational/irrational, healthy/pathological, and individually or socially produced. 

Communication

COMM 114J. CSI: Food Justice: Examine food justice from multiple analytical and theoretical perspectives: race, class, diversity, equity, legal-institutional, business, ethical, ecological, scientific, cultural, and socio-technical. Compare political strategies of food justice organizations/movements aimed at creating healthy and sustainable food systems locally and globally. Prerequisites: COMM 10.

COMM 167. Reproductive Discourse and Gender (COMM 10, COMM 100A, and COMM 100B or 100C)  

Critical Gender Studies

CGS 114. Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Class: (Cross-listed with ETHN 183.) Gender is often neglected in studies of ethnic/racial politics. This course explores the relationship of race, ethnicity, class, and gender by examining the participation of working class women of color in community politics and how they challenge mainstream political theory.

Economics

ECON 140. Economics of Health-Care Producers: Provides an overview of the physician, hospital, and pharmaceutical segments of the health sector. Uses models of physician behavior, for-profit and nonprofit institutions to understand the trade-offs facing health-sector regulators and the administrators of public and private insurance arrangements. Prerequisites: Econ 2 or 100B

ECON 141. Economics of Health-Care Consumers: Demand for health care and health insurance, employer-provision of health insurance and impact on wages and job changes. Cross-country comparisons of health systems. Prerequisites: Econ 100C.

Ethnic Studies

ETHN 142. Medicine, Race, and the Global Politics of Inequality: Globalization fosters both the transmission of AIDS, cholera, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases and gross inequalities in the resources available to prevent and cure them. This course focuses on how race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and nation both shape and are shaped by the social construction of health and disease worldwide.

Family Medicine and Public Health

FPMU 102. Biostatistics in Public Health: Fundamentals of biostatistics and basic methods for analysis of continuous and binary outcomes for one, two, or several groups. Includes: summarizing and displaying data; probability; statistical distributions; central limit theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing; comparing means of continuous variables between two groups; comparing proportions between two groups; simple and multiple linear regression. Hands-on data analysis using software and statistical applications in public health. Prerequisites: FPMU 40; PSYC 60 or MATH 11 or MATH 3C or MATH 10A or MATH 10B

FPMU 110. Health Behavior and Chronic Disease: This course introduces health behavior concepts through applications to chronic disease prevention. The focus is on smoking, dietary behaviors, and physical activity and is organized around relationships to health, measurement, influencing factors, interventions, and translation to public health practice. Prerequisites: FPMU 40

Global Health Program

GLBH 129 (cross-listed with ANSC 129). Meaning and Healing: This course examines the nature of healing across cultures, with special emphasis on religious and ritual healing.

GLBH 160. Global Health Policy: Students will learn fundamental principles and concepts of global health policy, law, and governance. The course will focus on identifying critical global health policy challenges and solving them using a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the perspectives of various stakeholders. 

GLBH 198. Directed Group Study (4): Directed group study for students to elaborate the intellectual analysis and critique of the required field experience for students enrolled in the Global Health program. Prerequisites:departmental authorization required.

GLBH 199. Independent Study in Global Health Field Experience (4): Independent study opportunity for students to elaborate the intellectual analysis and critique of the required field experience for students enrolled in the Global Health program. Prerequisites: departmental authorization required.

Latin American Studies

LATI 122A. Field Research Methods for Migration Studies: Seminar: Introductory survey of methods used by social and health scientists to gather primary research data on international migrant and refugee populations, including sample surveys, unstructured interviewing, and ethnographic observation. Basic fieldwork practices, ethics, and problem-solving techniques will also be covered. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 122A and LATI 122A. Recommended: advanced competency in conversational Spanish.Prerequisites: permission of instructor (department authorization required).

Political Science

POLI 111D. Social Norms and Global Development (4): Study of types of social norms and practices, and how to change them. Illustrated with development examples such as the end of footbinding, female genital cutting, urban violence in Colombia, Serbian student revolution, early marriage, and other adverse gender norms.  IS THIS THE CORRECT DESCRIPTION?

Psychology

PSYC 100. Clinical Psychology (4) (formerly named PSYC 163): This course provides a comprehensive overview of the causes, characteristics, and treatment of psychological disorders. Particular emphasis is given to the interaction between biological, psychological, and sociocultural processes contributing to abnormal behavior. Students may not receive credit for both Psychology 163 and Psychology 100.

PSYC 101. Developmental Psychology: This course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of developmental psychology, including topics in cognitive, language, and social development.

PSYC 124. Clinical Assessment and Treatment: This course provides an introduction to the history, purpose, and recent changes to theDiagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders along with appropriate evidence-based interventions. Other topics include psychiatric emergencies, crisis management, and ethics. Recommended preparation: Completion of Psychology 100.

PSYC 125. Clinical Neuropsychology: This course provides a fundamental understanding of brain-behavior relationships as applied to the practice of clinical neuropsychology. Major topics include functional neuroanatomy, principles of neuropsychological assessment and diagnosis, and the neuropsychological presentation of common neurologic and psychiatric conditions.

PSYC 134. Eating Disorders: This course provides an overview of the biology and psychology of eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Abnormal, as well as normal, eating will be discussed from various perspectives including endocrinological, neurobiological, psychological, sociological, and evolutionary.

PSYC 155. Social Psychology and Medicine: This course provides an exploration of health, illness, treatment, and delivery of treatment as they relate to psychological concepts and research and considers how the social psychological perspective might be extended into medical fields

PSYC 168. Psychological Disorders of Childhood: This course provides an overview of psychological disorders in children. Topics may include anxiety disorders, depressive and bipolar disorders, communication and learning disorders, conduct problems, autism, and other conditions. Emphasis is placed on symptomatology, assessment, etiological factors, epidemiology, and treatment.

PSYC 172. Psychology of Human Sexuality:  This course provides an overview of human sexuality research including diversity of sexual behavior and identities, sex and gender development, intimate relationships, and sexual dysfunction. Recommended preparation: completion of Psychology 1, 2, or 106. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

PSYC 179. Drugs, Addiction, and Mental Disorders: This course provides an overview of the use, abuse, liability, and psychotherapeutic effects of drugs on humans.

PSYC 181. Drugs and Behavior: Develops basic principles in psychopharmacology while exploring the behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs and mechanisms of action of drugs.

PSYC 188. Impulse and Control Disorders: This course provides an overview of problems of impulse control, which are important features of major psychiatric disorders and also of atypical patterns of behavior including pathological gambling, compulsive sex, eating, exercise, and shopping. Topics include development, major common features, treatment, and neurobiological basis of impulse control disorders. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

Sociology

SOCI 113. Sociology of the Aids Epidemic: This course considers the social, cultural, political, and economic aspects of HIV/AIDS. Topics include the social context of transmission; the experiences of women living with HIV; AIDS activism; representations of AIDS; and the impact of race and class differences

SOCI 134. The Making of Modern Medicine: A study of the social, intellectual, and institutional aspects of the nineteenth-century transformation of clinical medicine, examining both the changing content of medical knowledge and therapeutics, and the organization of the medical profession.

SOCI 135. Medical Sociology: An inquiry into the roles of culture and social structure in mediating the health and illness experiences of individuals and groups. Topics include the social construction of illness, the relationships between patients and health professionals, and the organization of medical work.

SOCI 136E. Sociology of Mental Illness: An Historical Approach: An examination of the social, cultural, and political factors involved in the identification and treatment of mental illness. This course will emphasize historical material, focusing on the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries. Developments in England as well as the United States will be examined from an historical perspective.

SOCI 136F. Sociology of Mental Illness in Contemporary Society: This course will focus on recent developments in the mental illness sector and on the contemporary sociological literature on mental illness. Developments in England as well as the United States will be examined.

SOCI 138. Genetics and Society: The class will first examine the direct social effects of the “genetic revolution”: eugenics, genetic discrimination, and stratification. Second, the implications of thinking of society in terms of genetics, specifically—sociobiology, social Darwinism, evolutionary psychology, and biology.

SOCI 143. Suicide: Traditional and modern theories of suicide will be reviewed and tested. The study of suicide will be treated as one method for investigating the influence of society on the individual.

Scripps Institute

SIO 189. Pollution, the Environment, and Health: The goal is to understand the scope of the pollution problem facing the planet. Students will learn the properties of chemicals in the environment and survey the biological mechanisms that determine their accumulation and toxicity. Prerequisites: Chem 6C and BILD 1 or 3 or consent of instructor.

Urban Studies and Planning

USP 144. Environmental and Preventive Health Issue: This course will analyze needs of populations, highlighting current major public health problems such as chronic and communicable diseases, environmental hazards of diseases, psychiatric problems and additional diseases, new social mores affecting health maintenance, consumer health awareness and health practices, special needs of economically and socially disadvantaged populations. The focus is on selected areas of public and environmental health, namely: epidemiology, preventive services in family health, communicable and chronic disease control, and occupational health.

USP 145. Aging: The Social and Health Policy Issues: This course will provide a brief introduction to the nature and problems of aging, with emphasis on socioeconomic and health status; determinants of priorities of social and health policies will be examined through analysis of the structure and organization of selected programs for the elderly. Field visits will constitute part of the course

USP 147. Case Studies in Health-Care Programs/Poor and Underserved Populations (if not taken for upper-division policy requirement): The purpose of this course is to identify the special health needs of low income and underserved populations and to review their status of care, factors influencing the incidence of disease and health problems, and political and legislative measures related to access and the provision of care. Selected current programs and policies that address the health-care needs of selected underserved populations such as working poor, inner city populations, recent immigrants, and persons with severe disabling mental illnesses will be studied. Offered in alternate years.

Medical Humanities:

History

*HISC 109. Invention of Tropical Disease: Explores the origins of the idea of the “tropics” and “tropical disease” as a legacy of European conquest and colonization, and introduces students to themes in the history of colonialism, tropical medicine, and global public health.

HISC 115. History of Modern Medicine: Explores the origin of clinical method, the hospital, internal surgery, and the medical laboratory, as well as the historical roots of debates over health-care reform, genetic determinism, and the medicalization of society.

HISC 116. History of Bioethics: The story behind the postwar rise of bioethics—medical scandals breaking in the mass media, the development of novel technologies for saving and prolonging life, the emergence of new diseases, the unprecedented scope for manipulation opened up by biology.

Philosophy

PHIL 150. Philosophy of Cognitive Science: Theoretical, empirical, methodological, and philosophical issues at work in the cognitive sciences (e.g., psychology, linguistics, neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and computer science), concerning things such as mental representation, consciousness, rationality, explanation, and nativism. 

PHIL 163. Biomedical Ethics: Moral issues in medicine and the biological sciences, such as patient’s rights and physician’s responsibilities, abortion and euthanasia, the distribution of health care, experimentation, and genetic intervention.

PHIL 164. Technology and Human Values: Philosophical issues involved in the development of modern science, the growth of technology, and control of the natural environment. The interaction of science and technology with human nature and political and moral ideals.

PHIL 173. Topics in Bioethics: An in-depth exploration of an issue in Bioethics. Topics will vary, and may include the ethics of genetic engineering, mental capacity and genuinely informed consent, the just distribution of health care, the ethics of geo-engineering, and the ethics of climate change and health

Critical Gender Studies

CGS 111. Gender and the Body: Various approaches to the study of gendered bodies. Possible topics to include masculinities/femininities; lifecycles; biology, culture, and identity; medical discourses; and health issues. May be taken for credit three times when topics vary.

Literature

LTCS 155. Health, Illness and Global Culture: The course will examine one or more forms of cultural production or cultural practice from a variety of theoretical and historical perspectives. Topics may include: contemporary debates on culture, genres of popular music/fiction/film, AIDS and culture, the history of sexuality, subcultural styles, etc. Repeatable for credit when topics vary.

LTCS 165. Spcial Topics: The Politics of Food his course will examine the representation and politics of food in literary and other cultural texts. Topics may include: food and poverty, the fast food industry, controversies about seed, sustainable food production, myths about hunger, eating and epistemology, aesthetics, etc. Repeatable for credit up to three times when topics vary.

Global Processes (***not accepted for minor electives):

Anthropology

ANSC 125. Gender, Sexuality, and Society: How are gender and sexuality shaped by cultural ideologies, social institutions, and social change? We explore their connections to such dimensions of society as kinship and family, the state, religion, and popular culture. We also examine alternative genders/sexualities cross-culturally.

ANSC 140/HMNR 101. Human Rights II: Contemporary Issues: Interdisciplinary discussion that outlines the structure and functioning of the contemporary human rights regime, and then delves into the relationship between selected human rights protections—against genocide, torture, enslavement, political persecution, etc.—and their violation, from the early Cold War to the present. Prerequisites: CAT1 or CAT2 or CAT3 or CAT125 or DOC1 or DOC2 or DOC3 or HUM1 or HUM2 or HUM3 or HUM4 or HUM5 or MCWP40 or MCWP41 or MCWP50 or MCWP125 or MMW11 or MMW12 or MMW13 or MMW14 or MMW15 or MMW21 or MMW22 or WCWP10A or WCWP10B.

ANSC 145A. International Politics and Drugs: This course examines the domestic and international aspects of the drug trade. It will investigate the drug issues from the perspectives of consumers, producers, traffickers, money launderers, and law enforcement. Course material covers the experience of the United States, Latin America, Turkey, Southeast Asia, Western Europe, and Japan.

ANSC 160. Nature, Culture, and the Environment: Course examines theories concerning the relation of nature and culture. Particular attention is paid to explanations of differing ways cultures conceptualize nature. Along with examples from non-Western societies, the course examines the Western environmental ideas embedded in contemporary environmentalism.

Communication

COMM 112G. IM: Language and Globalization: The interaction of language and culture in human communication. New and old languages, standard and dialect, dominant and endangered are the special focus. Selected languages as examples of how languages exist in contemporary contexts. Students will not receive credit for COHI 135 and COMM 112G. Prerequisites: COMM 10.

COMM 114J. CSI: Food Justice: Examine food justice from multiple analytical and theoretical perspectives: race, class, diversity, equity, legal-institutional, business, ethical, ecological, scientific, cultural, and socio-technical. Compare political strategies of food justice organizations/movements aimed at creating healthy and sustainable food systems locally and globally. Prerequisites: COMM 10.

COMM 156. Colonialism and Culture

COMM 179. Media and Technology: Global Nature and Global Culture: Considers globalization’s impact on concepts of nature in and through media texts, information systems, circulation of consumer goods and services, the emergence of global brands, science, health initiatives, environmental media activism, technology transfer in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Students will not receive credit for COCU 141A and COMM 179. Prerequisites: COMM 10 and one from COMM 100A, 100B, 100C.

 

Critical Gender Studies

 

CGS 114. Gender, Race, Ethnicity, & Class (Cross-listed with ETHN 183) Gender is often neglected in studies of ethnic/racial politics. This course explores the relationship of race, ethnicity, class, and gender by examining the participation of working class women of color in community politics and how they challenge mainstream political theory.

 

Ethnic Studies

ETHN 142. Medicine, Race, and the Global Politics of Inequality: Globalization fosters both the transmission of AIDS, cholera, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases and gross inequalities in the resources available to prevent and cure them. This course focuses on how race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and nation both shape and are shaped by the social construction of health and disease worldwide.

Latin American Studies

LATI 122B. Field Research Methods for Migration Studies: Practicum: Students will collect survey and qualitative data among Mexican migrants to the United States and potential migrants, participate in team research, organize data collected for analysis, and submit a detailed outline of an article to be based on field data. Students may not receive credit for both SOCI 122B and LATI 122B. Recommended: advanced competency in conversational Spanish. Prerequisites: LATI 122A; permission of instructor (department authorization required)

Political Science

POLI 113A. East Asian Thought in Comparative Perspective: This course examines the major traditions of East Asian thought in comparative perspective. Topics include Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and contemporary nationalist and East Asian political thought. Throughout, focused comparisons and contrasts will be made between western and eastern thought. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

POLI 122. Politics of Human Rights: What do we mean by “international human rights”? Are they universal? This course examines human rights abuse and redress over time, and across different regions of the world. From this empirically grounded perspective, we critically evaluate contemporary human rights debates.

POLI 125. Gender, Politics and Globalization What have been the effects of globalization on gender, and how has gender shaped conceptions and processes of globalization? Through case studies drawn from the global north and south, this course critically assesses contemporary theoretical debates on global gender justice.

POLI 125B. The Politics of Food in a Global Economy: This course explores emerging issues in production and consumption of food in a global economy. On production side, we discuss issues such as famine, overproduction of commercial crops, and sustainability. On consumption side, we explore issues such as fair trade, ethical consumption, and public health consequences (such as obesity). Then we discuss the roles of governments, international organizations, and communities to address these issues.

POLI 127. Politics of Developing Countries: This course critically examines central concepts and theories of development, and assesses their utility in understanding political, economic, and social change in the developing world. Central case studies are drawn from three regions: Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Southeast Asia.

POLI 140D. International Human Rights Law: Migrant Populations: International migration creates a distinct set of human rights challenges. This course examines the conflict between international legal obligations and domestic politics of citizenship, human rights, asylum, and human trafficking.

POLI 145A. International Politics and Drugs: This course examines the domestic and international aspects of the drug trade. It will investigate the drug issues from the perspectives of consumers, producers, traffickers, money launderers, and law enforcement. Course material covers the experience of the United States, Latin America, Turkey, Southeast Asia, Western Europe, and Japan.

POLI 150A. Politics of Immigration: Comparative analysis of attempts by the United States and other industrialized countries to initiate, regulate and reduce immigration from Third World countries. Social and economic factors shaping outcomes of immigration policies, public opinion toward immigrants, anti-immigration movements, and immigration policy reform options in industrialized countries.

Sociology

SOCI 127. Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity: Examination of the role that race and ethnicity play in immigrant group integration. Topics include theories of integration, racial and ethnic identity formation, racial and ethnic change, immigration policy, public opinion, comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration.

SOCI 185. Globalization and Social Development: Social development is more than sheer economic growth. It entails improvements in the overall quality of human life, particularly in terms of access to health, education, employment, and income for the poorer sectors of the population. Course examines the impact of globalization on the prospects for attaining these goals in developing countries.

SOCI 188E. Community and Social Change in Africa: The process of social change in African communities, with emphasis on changing ways of seeing the world and the effects of religion and political philosophies of social change. The methods and data used in various village and community studies in Africa will be critically examined.

Global Health Senior Capstone Seminar (Majors Only - GLBH 150A & B)

thesis
During senior year- graduating students will participate in a two-quarter seminar open only to Global Health majors. This seminar will provide an opportunity to expand, deepen, and share the insights of your Global Health Field Experience with members of your cohort.
  • GLBH 150A will consist of intensive reading and discussion in fields related to each student’s primary interest and building on your field experience.
  • GLBH 150B will be a workshop with critical input from all participants focused on preparing a senior thesis that will provide an important credential for students in the next stage of their careers and as they prepare applications for graduate academic or professional training.
  • Senior Theses will be presented at the Horizons of Global Health Conference.
    • Horizons is a capstone conference in the spring quarter of each year will assemble all Global Health majors and minors and related entities and will feature a guest speaker with a distinguished reputation in global health along with presentations of theses by graduating participants.

***Students must complete their Global Health Field Experience Requirement prior to enrollment. 

GLBH 195. Instructional Apprenticeship in Global Health

Course gives students experience in teaching of global health courses. Students, under direction of instructor, lead discussion sections, attend lectures, review course readings, and meet regularly to prepare course materials and to evaluate examinations and papers. This course does not fulfill any Global Health major or minor requirements.

Requirements:

  1. Junior or Senior standing
  2. Minimum of a 3.0 GPA
  3. Must have received an "A" in the course you wish to apply for
  4. Student most contact the instructor to see if the instructor is interested in having an instruction apprentice.
  5. If the instructor approves, you may apply online
  6. Final approval required by department and academic senate.